Cassowary Poo!

Daintree Discovery Centre is now selling Cassowary Poo! A special product to raise awareness and conservation around these important keystone species.

Did you know cassowaries help grow the rainforest? They eat fruit and fungi and are the only known disperser of many larger-fruited rainforest plant species.

Once the fruit has passed through their digestive system, most of the fleshy part has been removed from the seed, leaving it ready to germinate in a lovely pile of compost – or Cassowary Poo! to you – in another part of the forest away from the mother tree.

What make this product even more special, is that for every sale, we give back to Rainforest Rescue, helping to protect the Daintree rainforest and restore important wildlife corridors.

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'Dino Dig' Sleuthing For Funsters

Budding junior paleontologists are enjoying getting down among the sand in the “Dino Dig” at Daintree Discovery Centre.

General Manager Brian Arnold said the centre’s latest attraction was aimed in part at keeping the kids entertained hunting for “fossils” while their parents relaxed and enjoyed a brew in the coffee shop.

“It’s a fun thing but with an educational component via our Jurassic Forest Dinosaur Display,” Mr Arnold said.

The Jurassic Forest exhibit features seven animated dinosaurs, some of which represent a special group that roamed parts of Queensland more than 65 million years ago. The models include a seven-metre long Ripper Lizard, a Giant Thunderbird and a dynamic Diprotodon.

“The rainforest north of the Daintree River which is home to the Daintree Discovery Centre is an ancient refuge and many plant species found at the centre are millions of years older than the dinosaurs – they are ‘green dinosaurs’, according to Sir David Attenborough,” he said.

“We examine the links between the rainforest and the role it plays in offsetting CO2 and the impact of climate change and how it affects the environment.

“We ask the question – did the dinosaurs disappear because of cataclysmic changes in the climate.”

The Daintree Discovery Centre was established in 1989 and is widely recognised as a leader in ecotourism, and in particular, environmental conservation.

The award-winning display showcases the oldest rainforest on the planet in a sustainable and environmentally sensitive manner, and works to preserve this fragile ecosystem through scientific research, revegetation programs and other carbon reduction initiatives.

Admission to Daintree Discovery Centre includes self-guided audio tours, access to the canopy tower and aerial walkways, various interpretive displays, a 68-page interpretive guidebook, and seven-day free re-entry to the children’s audio tour.

For more information on the Daintree Discovery Centre visit www.discoverthedaintree.com.

ENDS

For interview requests, please contact:
Tanya Snelling
Strategic PR
0417 202 663
tanya@strategicpr.com.au

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Boyds Forest Dragon

We have our very own dragon here in the Daintree ✌️ The Jalbil is also known as Boyds Forest Dragon and is endemic to the rainforests of Tropical North Queensland. These masters of camouflage tend to be quite elusive little creatures so we got lucky today.

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The First Rains

You can’t have a rainforest without a little rain, or in this case, a lot! Fortunately the Centre is located high off the ground, so visitors can enjoy the rain, and our Centre, while keeping their feet dry.

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Roaming Guides

Roaming guides will be on deck these school holidays at the award-winning Daintree Discovery Centre to add to visitors’ rainforest experience.

The guide, unmissable in a bright green shirt that stands out against the darker rainforest foliage, will provide interesting, structured talks at vantage points along the various walks and aerial walkway.

This is in addition to the free audio guides that are provided for visitors’ use as part of the entrance fee.

Structured talks on a variety of subjects include explanations of the biology, traditional and cultural uses and evolutionary niches of the different plant species that may be fruiting or flowering at the time.

Daintree Discovery Centre spokesperson Brian Arnold said the Centre was the perfect place for visitors to start their Daintree adventure as it offered an entertaining and informative insight into the ancient forest and its inhabitants and how the ecosystem worked.

“There is no doubt the Daintree is a bucket list destination and many people have spent a lot of time and money to come here.

“Our goal has always been to make sure these people leave the Centre with a lot more knowledge than what they arrived with, giving them the tools to go on and further explore this incredible eco-system.”

Mr Arnold said having the different interpretive walks from the forest floor to the the aerial walkway and 23-metre high canopy tower, means people can gain an understanding of the rainforest and its different stratas, from the ground up through the middle layers to the tops of the trees in the canopy.

“Our guide Brianna has been doing most of the roaming shifts so far and we have had really good feedback from visitors who appreciate the little extra insights and explanations and the opportunity to ask questions about the things they are seeing at that moment.”

“People can take in any or all of the various talks, depending on their interest. There is also time in between for lunch or a coffee in the cafe before seeing the rest of the exhibits and interactive displays in our interpretive centre,” Mr Arnold said.

The centre showcases the oldest rainforest on the planet in a sustainable and environmentally sensitive manner and works to preserve the fragile eco system through scientific research, revegetation programs and other carbon reduction initiatives.

He added that the Jurassic Forest display, which features life-size animated Australian dinosaurs and megafauna, were hugely popular with most visitors, particularly the families who had visited so far these holidays.

He encouraged locals from across the Tropical North who were interested in a self-drive adventure north of the Daintree River to apply for Douglas Shire’s Douglas Card.

This card entitles bona fide residents free travel on the Daintree Ferry between November 1 and February 28.

Application forms for the Douglas Card are available via the Douglas Shire Council website www.douglas.qld.gov.au or the Douglas Shire office and Mossman and Port Douglas libraries.

For more information on Daintree Discovery Centre visit www.discoverthedaintree.com.

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Leaf-tailed Geckos

Leaf-tailed geckos are masters of camouflage – their broken outlines and lichen-like patterns render them near invisible in their rainforest homes. At night they emerge to sit motionless on rocks and tree trunks, clinging to the surface with spidery limbs and bird-like feet.

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After almost 30 years under the ownership of founders Ron and Pam Birkett, the Daintree Discovery Centre has been sold to the Aboriginal Development Benefits Trust (ADBT).

Peter Cameron, chair of the ADBT, said the Daintree Discovery Centre was an award-winning world class interpretive facility with an established reputation in the tourism industry and was an important acquisition for the Trust’s portfolio.

ADBT, which is based in the Lower Gulf of Queensland, was established under the Gulf Communities Agreement negotiated between Century Mine, the Queensland State Government and Gulf Native Title groups.

Its role is to administer funds from the Century Mine, primarily for business development and Indigenous ownership/investment in business, while also helping to build economic empowerment for local Indigenous Australians and their communities.

“The purchase of the Discovery Centre offers huge potential for ADBT to further develop its community, youth and entrepreneurship programs within the Lower Gulf,” Mr Cameron said.

“Established in 1989, the Discovery Centre is widely recognised as a leader in the field of ecotourism, and in particular, environmental conservation.

“Not only does it showcase the oldest rainforest on the planet in a sustainable and environmentally sensitive manner, but its work to preserve this fragile eco system through scientific research, revegetation programs and other carbon reduction initiatives goes way beyond just tree planting.”

ADBT also operates the Doomadgee Roadhouse and Accommodation Units and partners with another Normanton Aboriginal organisation to manage Normanton Traders in the Gulf.

“It will be business as usual at the Discovery Centre, with no operational changes on the ground. We are all very excited to continue working with the fabulous staff who have made the business a huge success.”

“It has been a busy start to the tourism season and we are looking forward to this continuing over the coming months as we track into August and then September for the next school holiday period,” Mr Cameron added.

For Pam and Ron Birkett there hasn’t been much the Discovery Centre hasn’t seen since it was officially opened in June 1989 and today’s announcement marked the next step in the business’ future.

“Ron and I have had 27 wonderful years designing and developing the Discovery Centre from scratch and it’s going to be hard to ‘cut the umbilical cord’, but we were particularly pleased when ADBT expressed an interest in purchasing the business. It couldn’t have been a better fit,” Mrs Birkett said.

“When we look back over the past three decades there is so much to celebrate, just being crazy (or smart) enough to build an environmental centre in a tropical wilderness in the 1980’s was an outstanding achievement.

“We were just two ordinary working people who had a vision. We wanted to create something special and today the Discovery Centre is more than we could have hoped for.”

Mr Birkett said building a strong, happy and dedicated team had always given them tremendous pleasure and continued industry recognition had reinforced the success of the business.

“Although it has always been our aim to work on the business, not in the business, it is great to be able to hand over to ADBT.

“We are now looking forward to being able to spend more time travelling and Pam is keen to give her new golf clubs an airing,” he said.

For more information on ADBT visit www.adbt.com.au or the Daintree Discovery Centre visit www.discoverthedaintree.com.

ENDS

For interview requests, please contact:
Tanya Snelling
Strategic PR
0417 202 663
tanya@strategicpr.com.au

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Entry Fees

Adult: AUD$35.00
Concession/Student: AUD$32
Child: AUD$16.00 (5 - 17 years)
Family: AUD$85.00

Includes:
Audio Tour (8 languages)
68 Page Interpretive Guide Book
7 Day free re-entry
Children's Audio Tour (suit 5 - 9 years)

Recent Media

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