News & Media

Be Cass-O-wary

Cassowaries are an endangered species found throughout the rainforests and nearby woodlands and swamps of North Queensland.

These large flightless birds play an important role in the dispersal of rainforest plant seeds.

Cassowary populations face a variety of threats and, as habitat disappears, human contact with cassowaries is increasing.

• Never approach cassowaries.

• Never approach chicks—male cassowaries will defend them.

• Never feed cassowaries—it is illegal, dangerous and has caused cassowary deaths.

• Always slow down when driving in cassowary territory.

• Always keep dogs behind fences or on a leash.

• Always discard food scraps in closed bins.

 

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Watch a Giant Rainforest Mantis strike!

The Giant Rainforest Mantis (Hierodula majuscula) is one of Australia’s largest species.
Adult females can reach 70mm in body length and are very powerful.
In the wild they prey upon a wide variety of insects, and other invertebrates.

They are capable of catching small geckos and frogs if the opportunity arises.
As nymphs their colours vary, ranging from red-brown through to bright green.
By the time they mature they usually adopt a rich leaf-green colour.

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Cassowary Calling Card spreads the word on saving the Rainforest

Cape Tribulation, 13th December, 2017 – Who would think selling jelly beans as bird poo was a sweet idea?

But when the bird in question is the remarkable yet rare cassowary, those droppings should be promoted in the nicest possible way – its poo literally grows trees.

And the extremely popular bags of “Cassowary Poo” sold at the Daintree Discovery Centre are doing just that. The cassowary is much more to the rainforest than its largest and most exotic animal.

The birds eat fruit and fungi and as the material passes through their digestive system only the seed is left to be dropped and germinate in another part of the forest away from the mother tree.

Many rainforest species only grow from cassowary droppings. Daintree Discovery Centre manager Abi Ralph said the “poo” shows how vital the birds are to the rainforest in a way that appeals to children and adults alike.

“We were looking for something inventive for World Cassowary Day 2016. We had little bags of colourful chocolate, but due to our weather, we found they were melting.

“Now Cassowary Poo, which has been trademarked, has grown into this wonderful product that gets people talking and raises awareness of this crucial but endangered species.

“We can also supply Cassowary Poo wholesale to other likeminded businesses or businesses within Cassowary territory,” she said.

As well as being an enlightening treat, each packet of Cassowary Poo sold means a donation to Rainforest Rescue, which helps protect the Daintree environment, including restoring corridors for wildlife to move around freely.

For more information on Daintree Discovery Centre visit www.discoverthedaintree.com or Rainforest Rescue visit rainforestrescue.org.au.

ENDS

For interview requests, please contact:

Tanya Snelling

Strategic PR

0417 202 663

tanya@strategicpr.com.au

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Your Photos of the Daintree

The world’s oldest rainforest has so much to offer, even we don’t get to see everything despite being lucky enough to experience the Daintree every day.

We are therefore always excited to discover your #discoverthedaintree and #daintreediscoverycentre Instagram pics – thank you for all the #hashtagging!

Through your eyes, we saw the Daintree River winding it’s way towards Thornton Peak, marvelled at Sunbirds, Boyd’s Forest Dragons and Ulysses Butterflies, learnt more about cassowaries – they are tall! – and got to stop by the beach as well:

 

PS:  Did you know that ‘Kasu-weri’ means ‘Horned Head?

Photo credits:

@daintreesafaris @reubennutt @bris_vegas @juli_jaaaa @grace_taylor92 @wrazian

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Farewell to Yasi our beautiful Carpet Python

Last month, sadly our beautiful carpet python Yasi passed away.

Yasi was an absolutely beautiful snake, who was equally adored by staff and visitors.

All of us loved him, so we thought we would share this video we made of him:

Carpet pythons are non-venomous and found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia as well as on the Northern Solomon Islands and the Bismarck Archipelago.

Their scientific name is Morelia Spilota, while they are commonly also referred to as carpet snakes or diamond pythons.

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Digging Deep for Rainforest Rescue

The conservation and reforestation work of Rainforest Rescue in the Daintree has received a $2510.90 boost thanks to the support of the Daintree Discovery Centre (DDC) and its many visitors.

This year’s contribution included $827.95 donated by the public at the Centre in the 2016-17 financial year. This amount was matched by the Centre and boosted by a further $855 raised through sales of reusable take-away Cassowary rainforest cups.

Rainforest Rescue is a conservation charity, set up in 1988 to protect rainforests through buying threatened properties, restoring damaged and fragmented habitat through reforestation, conserving biodiversity and cultural heritage of rainforest and learning, sharing and raising awareness of the forest.

Daintree Discovery Centre general manager Brian Arnold said it had worked in partnership with Rainforest Rescue in recent years through not only fundraising, but also all-important seed collecting and tree planting.

“The only way we can increase cassowary numbers is by creating more habitat and, in turn, food. Our partnership with Rainforest Rescue ensures the survival not only of the rainforest but also its animals, especially the cassowary,” Mr Arnold said.

Mr Arnold said in addition to the contribution made through the sale off the reusable take-away Cassowary rainforest cups, the Centre had added Cassowary Poo! to its product offering.

“We are really excited to offer this new product, which not only draws attention to the cassowary and its importance to the Daintree Rainforest, but is also a fun, tasty jelly bean treat.

“It will be a great promotional tool to lift the profile of the Centre and its role as a leader in sustainable tourism.”

Mr Arnold said he hoped Cassowary Poo! would one day be offered at other retail outlets throughout the region where the cassowary lives.

“We would also love to see this product on an airline that has direct access to the people/tourists who choose to holiday in Queensland and are looking to make the Daintree one of the key places they want to visit.

Rainforest Rescue chief executive officer Julian Gray was delighted with this year’s financial boost by a local business and visitors from the region and throughout the world who appreciated their rainforest experience.

“We greatly appreciate the strong support of the Daintree Discovery Centre in engaging its visitors to help support the conservation of the internationally unique Daintree rainforest,” Mr Gray said.

“It’s very important for tourism businesses to support the long-term conservation and enhancement of this fragile and threatened environment.

“In addition to financial support, we appreciate the contribution Daintree Discovery Centre makes in collecting seeds for Rainforest Rescue’s Native Nursery, which powers our reforestation work.”

The nursery is located in the Daintree National Park on land owned by the Queensland Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Rainforest Rescue’s nursery manager oversees a committed group of volunteers who help raise, on average, 20,000 plants comprised of more than 200 species a year.

The nursery propagates and grows all the rainforest trees for Rainforest Rescue’s Daintree lowland revegetation projects, and the efforts of other Daintree landholders. All of the seeds are collected from the Daintree lowland rainforest between the Daintree River and Cape Tribulation and the trees are planted in this area.

Prior to 2010 the nursery was managed for many years by the Daintree Cassowary Care Group, a volunteer community organisation.

The Daintree Discovery Centre showcases the oldest rainforest on the planet in a sustainable and environmentally sensitive manner, and works to preserve the fragile eco system through scientific research, revegetation programs and other carbon reduction initiatives.

For more information on Daintree Discovery Centre visit www.discoverthedaintree.com or Rainforest Rescue visit www.daintreerescue.org.au

ENDS

For interview requests, please contact:

Tanya Snelling

Strategic PR

0417 202 663

tanya@strategicpr.com.au

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The Daintree Through Your Eyes

We love seeing your view of the Daintree and are always excited to find your latest #discoverthedaintree and #daintreediscoverycentre Instagram pics – thanks everyone for #hashtagging!

You found our dinosaurs, hidden waterfalls, boardwalks, a beautiful praying mantis and a cassowary, and even enjoyed the Daintree from above:

 

PS:  Did you know that ‘Kasu-weri’ means ‘Horned Head?

Photo credits: @cairnslife365 @maurits_kortenbout @fnq_family_outdoor_adventures @latinos.travel @sarabgalvan @daintreelife 

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Cassowary Poo!

Daintree Discovery Centre is now selling Cassowary Poo! A special product to raise awareness and conservation around these important keystone species.

Did you know cassowaries help grow the rainforest? They eat fruit and fungi and are the only known disperser of many larger-fruited rainforest plant species.

Once the fruit has passed through their digestive system, most of the fleshy part has been removed from the seed, leaving it ready to germinate in a lovely pile of compost – or Cassowary Poo! to you – in another part of the forest away from the mother tree.

What make this product even more special, is that for every sale, we give back to Rainforest Rescue, helping to protect the Daintree rainforest and restore important wildlife corridors.

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Entry Fees

Adult: AUD$35.00
Concession/Student: AUD$32
Child: AUD$16.00 (5 - 17 years)
Family: AUD$85.00

Includes:
Audio Tour (8 languages)
68 Page Interpretive Guide Book
7 Day free re-entry
Children's Audio Tour (suit 5 - 9 years)

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